Photo of Jason C. Brown

Jason Brown founded the Brown Law Offices, P.A. in 2003 after working for several years as an associate attorney in downtown Minneapolis. He graduated with honors from Mankato State University in 1997 and the William Mitchell College of Law in 2000.

Jason has successfully litigated against some of the more recognized divorce attorneys in the Twin Cities. He has been repeatedly named a “Super Lawyer” by Thomson Reuters, and one of the Top 100 Family Law Attorneys in Minnesota by the Society of Legal Advocates.

In addition to his work as a lawyer, Jason serves as a mediator, and court-appointed early neutral evaluator, in divorce and family law cases throughout Minnesota. He frequently writes and speaks concerning divorce and family law issues, including several invitations to present seminars for the Minnesota Judicial Branch in St. Paul.

Jason is the former chairperson of the Family Law Section of the Minnesota Trial Lawyer’s Association, and taught divorce and family law coursework within the paralegal program at North Hennepin Community College. He publishes the Minnesota Family Law Blog, which has been recognized as a “Top 25″ by the Minnesota State Bar Association.

Outside of the office, Jason enjoys playing the bass and electric guitar and spending time in the north woods of Wisconsin.


Areas of Practice
  • Divorce
  • Custody
  • Adoption
  • Restraining Orders
  • Prenuptial Agreements
  • Criminal Defense
  • Estate Planning
Notable Cases
  • Representation of Four Grandparents in Minnesota's First Quad-Parenting Adoption
  • Representation of Client in Minnesota's First Same-Sex Divorce
Bar Admissions
  • Minnesota State Bar, 2000
  • US District Court - District of Minnesota, 2002
Education
  • William Mitchell College of Law, 2000
  • Minnesota State University, Mankato, 1997
Joined Firm
  • 2003
Professional Associations & Activities
  • Minnesota State Bar Association
  • Presenter, Various CLE Courses
  • Monthly Columnist, Minnesota Lawyer Newspaper

While divorces are very emotional and strenuous for parents, they can be equally as difficult for the children. One alternative-parenting schedule is referred to as bird nesting or “nesting.” This type of parenting plan is designed to limit the disruption to the children’s normal schedule after a divorce. Nesting requires the parents to move homes

Stepparent adoptions can be complex proceedings. Courts generally try to preserve the biological parent-child relationship. However, when this is not in the best interest of the child, stepparent adoptions are allowed. Each stepparent adoption has two parts. The first involves an effort to “terminate” the rights of one of the biological parent and the adoption

Divorces can vastly range in price depending on the case circumstances. Many factors impact the cost of a divorce, including how agreeable the parties are or if a trial is necessary. Uncontested divorce, where the parties are agreeable on all topics, are generally the most cost-efficient divorce. However, it is not uncommon for a divorce

Financial Early Neutral Evaluation (FENE), Social Early Neutral Evaluation (SENE), and mediation are all different processes for alternative dispute resolution (ADR). ADR is commonly used in family law to help litigants settle their cases and avoid a costly trial. Trial bound cases can take months to bring to a conclusion and both parties are generally

Court records are accessible by the public. While not everyone may have access to court information from their computer, one may be able to go to the courthouse to obtain certain documents or pleadings about a particular case. For many parties in family law matters, privacy is important. Whether parties are discussing finances or child

Family law is incredibly personal, especially when it deals with custody and parenting time. Deciding on the specifics of a parenting time agreement can be difficult and complex. Even with a written order, situations or unforeseen obligations may arise that both parents cannot anticipate during their normal parenting time. Flexibility is needed in any custody

The current COVID-19 pandemic is creating a new sense of normal. Many people may be wondering how the COVID-19 will impact their parenting time. What are you allowed or not allowed to do? For all co-parents, it is important to understand the executive and court orders regarding your parenting time to insure you are operating

No matter how necessary, divorce is, by nature, emotionally wrenching for all parties involved. Beyond the inherent conflict between separating spouses, this process may also lead to significant issues between other family members — including, most notably, divorcing parents and their children.

It’s possible to achieve a new normal, but far from easy. Reunification therapy

Divorce may be the most common approach for ending a marriage in Minnesota, but it’s by no means the only available option. Depending on your situation, you may be eligible for an annulment. First, however, it’s critical to understand the differences between annulment and divorce.

Validity of the Marriage

Both annulment and divorce have the