Minnesota is a "no-fault" divorce state, and has been since the mid 1970's. Typical issues involved in a divorce include custody, child support, property division and spousal maintenance. While some divorces come to conclusion following a trial, the vast majority of cases resolve outside of the courtroom.

In this video, attorney Jason Brown provides a summary of the three most common ways that divorce cases are resolved in Minnesota: (1) direct negotiation; (2) alternative dispute resolution (such as mediation or early neutral evaluation); or (3) a trial. The good news is that the vast majority of family law cases settle outside the

Divorce never occurs in a funnel. The process impacts those you love, including your parents, siblings, and close friends. Children, in particular, can be negatively affected by divorce, which may throw every element of the lives they’ve always known into upheaval. Despite this, it’s possible for kids to emerge emotionally unscathed — and to even

Minnesota courts typically aim to help the children of divorce maintain strong relationships with both parents. In the long-term, this approach is of greatest benefit to children impacted by divorce — but in the short-term, it can cause major headaches for their parents. Even if parents enjoy a largely amicable relationship, they may struggle to

Divorce is difficult enough as is, but what if you’re not entirely healthy as you undertake this emotional process? Unfortunately, your physical ailments can have a detrimental impact on your emotional status — and vice versa. Both physical and mental health concerns amplify the inherent challenges of divorce. Keep the following in mind as you

Single motherhood can be a lonely experience. Many Minnesota moms lack the resources or connected community they need to thrive. Thankfully, a variety of programs are designed specifically to meet the needs of single moms. As you adjust to life as a new parent, don’t hesitate to check out these programs:

Jeremiah Program

Minnesota’s Jeremiah