There are two type of custody under Minnesota law: (1) physical custody; and (2) legal custody. Physical custody involves the day to day care of a child, while legal custody involves key decisions concerning a child's education, healthcare and religion. The "best interest of the child" standard applies.

Custody cases in Minnesota are complex if the parties do not agree. Legal custody, physical custody and parenting time disputes involve an entangled set of ever-evolving statutes and caselaw. Alcoholism, drug abuse, mental illness, domestic abuse, special needs, and child development are just a few of the issues that must be addressed.

Where should you

While divorces are very emotional and strenuous for parents, they can be equally as difficult for the children. One alternative-parenting schedule is referred to as bird nesting or “nesting.” This type of parenting plan is designed to limit the disruption to the children’s normal schedule after a divorce. Nesting requires the parents to move homes

Family law is incredibly personal, especially when it deals with custody and parenting time. Deciding on the specifics of a parenting time agreement can be difficult and complex. Even with a written order, situations or unforeseen obligations may arise that both parents cannot anticipate during their normal parenting time. Flexibility is needed in any custody

The current COVID-19 pandemic is creating a new sense of normal. Many people may be wondering how the COVID-19 will impact their parenting time. What are you allowed or not allowed to do? For all co-parents, it is important to understand the executive and court orders regarding your parenting time to insure you are operating

Divorce may end your official marital relationship, but as parents, you’ll likely maintain some semblance of contact throughout your children’s lives. If you intend to co-parent, this contact could prove surprisingly frequent; many divorced parents check in on a daily basis. Conflict is to be expected, but it can quickly be resolved with effective communication

No matter how necessary, divorce is, by nature, emotionally wrenching for all parties involved. Beyond the inherent conflict between separating spouses, this process may also lead to significant issues between other family members — including, most notably, divorcing parents and their children.

It’s possible to achieve a new normal, but far from easy. Reunification therapy

From job opportunities to a distaste for cold weather, a variety of factors may prompt divorced parents to leave Minnesota. Such departures may be totally justified, but they still cause considerable upheaval for the children of divorce. An out-of-state move may prompt new custody and parenting time concerns, as outlined below:

Preserving the Best Interests

Minnesota courts typically aim to help the children of divorce maintain strong relationships with both parents. In the long-term, this approach is of greatest benefit to children impacted by divorce — but in the short-term, it can cause major headaches for their parents. Even if parents enjoy a largely amicable relationship, they may struggle to

Single motherhood can be a lonely experience. Many Minnesota moms lack the resources or connected community they need to thrive. Thankfully, a variety of programs are designed specifically to meet the needs of single moms. As you adjust to life as a new parent, don’t hesitate to check out these programs:

Jeremiah Program

Minnesota’s Jeremiah