There are two type of custody under Minnesota law: (1) physical custody; and (2) legal custody. Physical custody involves the day to day care of a child, while legal custody involves key decisions concerning a child's education, healthcare and religion. The "best interest of the child" standard applies.

The current COVID-19 pandemic is creating a new sense of normal. Many people may be wondering how the COVID-19 will impact their parenting time. What are you allowed or not allowed to do? For all co-parents, it is important to understand the executive and court orders regarding your parenting time to insure you are operating

Divorce may end your official marital relationship, but as parents, you’ll likely maintain some semblance of contact throughout your children’s lives. If you intend to co-parent, this contact could prove surprisingly frequent; many divorced parents check in on a daily basis. Conflict is to be expected, but it can quickly be resolved with effective communication

No matter how necessary, divorce is, by nature, emotionally wrenching for all parties involved. Beyond the inherent conflict between separating spouses, this process may also lead to significant issues between other family members — including, most notably, divorcing parents and their children.

It’s possible to achieve a new normal, but far from easy. Reunification therapy

Child custody and parenting time arrangements vary dramatically from one couple to the next. When resolved in court, these matters largely come down to the best interests of the child. This can be frustrating for parents, who may disagree vehemently on what, exactly, constitutes a child’s best interests. In Minnesota, courts typically take the following factors into account:

Continue Reading How Does the Court Determine What’s in the Child’s Best Interests?

While most Minnesota custody proceedings involve birth parents, third parties occasionally play a role in this process. Generally, Minnesota courts emphasize the best interests of the child, which include maintaining strong relationships with both parents. In select circumstances, traditional parental custody might not be ideal for vulnerable children — particularly if birth parents hold a history of abuse or neglect. In such situations, the custody of a third party such as a grandparent, aunt, uncle, or another adult may be the best option for maintaining the health and emotional wellbeing of the child in question.

Continue Reading How Third-Party Custody Works in Minnesota

From job opportunities to a distaste for cold weather, a variety of factors may prompt divorced parents to leave Minnesota. Such departures may be totally justified, but they still cause considerable upheaval for the children of divorce. An out-of-state move may prompt new custody and parenting time concerns, as outlined below:

Preserving the Best Interests

Divorced and separated couples find parenting time difficult enough to navigate in the best of circumstances, but the holidays add yet another hurdle to overcome. Even those who are typically in agreement regarding scheduling matters may struggle to see eye-to-eye when the holidays arrive. After all, no holiday celebration feels quite complete without the entire family. With a little effort, a reasonably satisfying outcome can be reached to allow both sides to enjoy quality time with their children. Keep reading to learn how:

Continue Reading Guide to Managing Parenting Time And the Holidays

If you have a case pending in a Minnesota state court, you may wonder how you can access case information? Do you need to go to the courthouse and make a request in person? The answer is yes and no. While some sensitive case information may only be available through public access terminals located at each Minnesota state courthouse, you can also access a great deal of case information online. In this article, we’ll discuss the types of cases and information available and the cost for accessing case information.

Continue Reading How Can I Access Minnesota Court Case Information?

Conflict is inevitable during divorce, but some disputes tend to be more emotionally charged than others. Custody issues, in particular, tend to raise tempers, with otherwise agreeable parents bickering about where their children will spend the majority of their time. These disputes can vary considerably from one family to the next, but a few patterns tend to hold strong:

Continue Reading Most Common Causes of Custody Disputes — And How to Avoid Them