There are a number of issues involved in dividing the assets and debts of the parties to a divorce, including valuation methods and determining what is "marital" and what is "non-marital." Minnesota law generally provides for an equitable (almost always equal) division of marital property.

Divorce challenges those caught in the middle in surprising and unpredictable ways. Whether your husband blindsided you by revealing that he had been having an affair with someone at work, or you and your spouse separated after less than a year, after realizing that the relationship had no enduring foundation, you likely have a lot

When you end a marriage, you understandably face a myriad of emotions, including sadness, anger, frustration, grief – and possibly even relief. The emotional turmoil that you face can mean that your decision-making skills sometimes suffer. However, you cannot afford to let your feelings rule you during this critical time, since your financial future could

In terms of dividing the assets and liabilities of the parties following divorce, the first step in the analysis involves determining which assets are “marital” and which assets are “non-marital.”

Simply stated, marital assets are those acquired during the marriage, through marital efforts. Non-marital assets are those that one spouse: (1) brings into the marriage;

At the end of the day, the vast majority of divorces in Minnesota result in an equal division of the marital estate (those assets and liabilities incurred, or accrued, during the marriage.

“Equal division,” however, is not the relevant standard. Pursuant to Minn. Stat. Sec. 518.58, the Court must make a “just and equitable division

In the vast majority of the divorce cases we handle, the parties own real property. Sometimes that property is a primary residence, while other times the property takes the form of a lake cabin, vacation home, investment property or business property.

Generally speaking, the equity resting in each piece of real estate is subject to

In addition to homes, automobiles, bank accounts and furniture, retirement plans may be “marital property,” subject to an equitable division among the parties to a divorce.

Many twenty-pound books have been written about the methods of valuing, and dividing, retirement interests. In fact, some lawyers make their living handling only the orders associated with slicing

Minnesota law categorizes property as marital or non-marital.

Marital property is usually divided equally while non-marital property is allocated entirely to the party who maintains the non-marital interest. Non-marital property involves the interest a party has in property accumulated prior to a marriage or property received as a gift or inheritence by one spouse, individually,