We often think about divorce in terms of dividing a couple’s assets: cars, homes, real estate, bank accounts, and investments top the list. Property division in divorce can be challenging. Sometimes, our most treasured assets don’t carry a price tag. Family keepsakes are a source of contention in divorce. They often lack monetary value, and they can be hard to divide between the parties for sentimental reasons. Learn the best course of action for dividing mementos in a divorce.

Catalogue Everything

It’s your responsibility to catalogue all of your assets in a divorce. The same responsibility applies to keepsakes. Memorabilia and gifts with special meaning should make your list. Don’t worry if the items have little monetary value. Your property will be divided in accordance with your state’s divorce laws. Minnesota is an equitable distribution state. A judge will divide assets in a way that’s fair and equitable for both parties.

For example, a couple’s dishware may be a wedding gift that passed down through generations of the wife’s family. The dishware may belong to the couple, but the wife will more likely get to keep it as part of the property division.

Who Gets the Pet?

The family pet is often a hotly contested asset. You may adoringly refer to your dog as your “baby.” The law doesn’t treat pets any differently from the family china. A poll from the American Academy of Matrimonial Lawyers found that pets are increasingly a custody issue in divorces. A judge will consider who will spend the most time caring for the pet, such as feeding, walking, and visits to the veterinarian.

Consider Your Motivations

Consider why you want a particular piece of memorabilia or family keepsake. Is it actually because it’s a memento that you can’t live without? Is it a power struggle between you and your soon-to-be ex-spouse? Does it remind you of a happier time before the divorce proceeding began? We’re all guilty of feeling spite and resentment from time to time. Ask yourself if you really want the item or if you just want more control over the situation.

Some judges will divide family keepsakes or mementos. Other judges will require that you do handle this division process through mediation. Talk to your attorney about what’s most appropriate for you.

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Photo of Jason Brown Jason Brown

Jason Brown founded the Brown Law Offices, P.A. in 2003 after working for several years as an associate attorney in downtown Minneapolis. He graduated, with honors, from Mankato State University, Mankato in 1997 and the William Mitchell College of Law in 2000.

Jason…

Jason Brown founded the Brown Law Offices, P.A. in 2003 after working for several years as an associate attorney in downtown Minneapolis. He graduated, with honors, from Mankato State University, Mankato in 1997 and the William Mitchell College of Law in 2000.

Jason has successfully litigated against some of the more recognized family law attorneys in the Twin Cities. He has been named a “Super Lawyer” by Thomson Reuters, and one of the Top 100 Family Law Attorneys in Minnesota by the Society of Legal Advocates.

In addition to his work as a lawyer, Jason serves as a mediator, and court-appointed early neutral evaluator, in divorce and family law cases throughout Minnesota. He frequently writes and speaks concerning divorce and family law issues, including several invitations to present seminars for the Minnesota Judicial Branch in St. Paul.

Beyond family law, Jason has represented hundreds of clients accused of a serious crime, including arson, fraud, unauthorized computer access, burglary, felony strangulation and obstruction of justice. He also provides estate planning services.

Local media appearances by Jason include WCCO Radio, KARE 11 Television, Fox 9 Television and WCCO Television. His national media appearances include NBC News, Time Magazine, USA Today and the Huffington Post.

Jason is the former chairperson of the Family Law Section of the Minnesota Trial Lawyer’s Association, and taught divorce and family law coursework within the paralegal program at North Hennepin Community College. He publishes the Minnesota Family Law Blog, which has been recognized as a “Top 25″ by the Minnesota State Bar Association.

Outside of the office, Jason enjoys playing the bass and electric guitar and spending time in the north woods of Wisconsin.


Areas of Practice
  • Divorce
  • Custody
  • Adoption
  • Restraining Orders
  • Prenuptial Agreements
  • Criminal Defense
  • Estate Planning
Notable Cases
  • Representation of Four Grandparents in Minnesota’s First Quad-Parenting Adoption
  • Representation of Client in Minnesota’s First Same-Sex Divorce
Bar Admissions
  • Minnesota State Bar, 2000
  • US District Court – District of Minnesota, 2002
Education
  • William Mitchell College of Law, 2000
  • Minnesota State University, Mankato, 1997
Joined Firm
  • 2003
Professional Associations & Activities
  • Minnesota State Bar Association
  • Presenter, Various CLE Courses
  • Monthly Columnist, Minnesota Lawyer Newspaper