We often think about divorce in terms of dividing a couple’s assets: cars, homes, real estate, bank accounts, and investments top the list. Property division in divorce can be challenging. Sometimes, our most treasured assets don’t carry a price tag. Family keepsakes are a source of contention in divorce. They often lack monetary value, and they can be hard to divide between the parties for sentimental reasons. Learn the best course of action for dividing mementos in a divorce.

Catalogue Everything

It’s your responsibility to catalogue all of your assets in a divorce. The same responsibility applies to keepsakes. Memorabilia and gifts with special meaning should make your list. Don’t worry if the items have little monetary value. Your property will be divided in accordance with your state’s divorce laws. Minnesota is an equitable distribution state. A judge will divide assets in a way that’s fair and equitable for both parties.

For example, a couple’s dishware may be a wedding gift that passed down through generations of the wife’s family. The dishware may belong to the couple, but the wife will more likely get to keep it as part of the property division.

Who Gets the Pet?

The family pet is often a hotly contested asset. You may adoringly refer to your dog as your “baby.” The law doesn’t treat pets any differently from the family china. A poll from the American Academy of Matrimonial Lawyers found that pets are increasingly a custody issue in divorces. A judge will consider who will spend the most time caring for the pet, such as feeding, walking, and visits to the veterinarian.

Consider Your Motivations

Consider why you want a particular piece of memorabilia or family keepsake. Is it actually because it’s a memento that you can’t live without? Is it a power struggle between you and your soon-to-be ex-spouse? Does it remind you of a happier time before the divorce proceeding began? We’re all guilty of feeling spite and resentment from time to time. Ask yourself if you really want the item or if you just want more control over the situation.

Some judges will divide family keepsakes or mementos. Other judges will require that you do handle this division process through mediation. Talk to your attorney about what’s most appropriate for you.

Print:
EmailTweetLikeLinkedIn
Photo of Jason C. Brown Jason C. Brown

Jason C. Brown has represented a wide variety of family law clients over the last 20 years, including teachers, homemakers, union construction workers, doctors, truck drivers, accountants, business owners, engineers, lawyers, mortgage brokers and Fortune 500 executives. Many of his cases have involved…

Jason C. Brown has represented a wide variety of family law clients over the last 20 years, including teachers, homemakers, union construction workers, doctors, truck drivers, accountants, business owners, engineers, lawyers, mortgage brokers and Fortune 500 executives. Many of his cases have involved complex custody disputes, alimony claims, and high net worth individuals, including several divorces in which the value of the marital estate exceeded ten million dollars. Every client, no matter their background, is important to Jason.

Jason routinely provides mediation services for family court litigants. He was a longtime board member and corporate secretary for Northgate Church in Ramsey. Early in his career, Jason served as law clerk to the Honorable Timothy R. Bloomquist, retired Chief Judge of Minnesota’s Tenth Judicial District.